top 50 stocks to invest in

Boeing (BA) announced plans to reduce the number of people it employs by 4,000 by June. Deutsche Bank’s Myles Walton explains why that’s good news for Boeing stock:

A Boeing 737 MAX on the assembly line Ted S. Warren/Associated Press

The Seattle Times is reporting employee reductions at BCA with an internal target of 4,000 fewer employees by June at BCA. The mechanism of the decline would be attrition and voluntary buy-outs. Per Boeings website through February, 1500+ of the headcount reduction has already taken place. Across the entire Boeing enterprise, employment is down 2,448 since YE highlighting efforts beyond BCA as well. Given the lower production on the 747 and 777 coupled with the higher automation activity and improved performance on the 787, a downtrend is likely to continue, which should be a significant boost to productivity.

top 50 stocks to invest in: Sunoco LP(SUN)

Advisors’ Opinion:

  • [By Lisa Levin]

    Friday afternoon, the non-cyclical consumer goods & services sector proved to be a source of strength for the market. Leading the sector was strength from Ballard Power Systems Inc. (USA) (NASDAQ: BLDP) and Sunoco LP (NYSE: SUN).

  • [By Lisa Levin]

    Thursday afternoon, the energy sector proved to be a source of strength for the market. Leading the sector was strength from Ballard Power Systems Inc. (USA) (NASDAQ: BLDP) and Sunoco LP (NYSE: SUN).

  • [By Douglas A. McIntyre]

    Exxon Mobil Corp. (NYSE: XOM) is the second largest company in America and the world’s largest oil company. Chevron Corp. (NYSE: CVX) is the third largest company in the United States. Valero Corp. (NYSE: VLO) is among the world’s largest refiners. Sunoco L.P. (NYSE: SUN) is one of North America’s largest owners of stations and convenience stores. BP PLC (NYSE: BP) is among the world’s oil behemoths. Shell is the U.S. branch of oil giant Royal Dutch Shell PLC (NYSE: RDS-A).

  • [By Lisa Levin]

    Here is the list of stocks going ex-dividend on August 3, 2016.

    J B Hunt Transport Services Inc (NASDAQ: JBHT) – $0.2200 dividend, 1.0791 percent yield
    Johnson Controls Inc (NYSE: JCI) – $0.2900 dividend, 2.6250 percent yield
    FirstEnergy Corp. (NYSE: FE) – $0.3600 dividend, 3.9680 percent yield
    Sunoco LP (NYSE: SUN) – $0.8255 dividend, 10.7347 percent yield
    Wells Fargo & Co (NYSE: WFC) – $0.3800 dividend, 3.1588 percent yield
    BP plc (ADR) (NYSE: BP) – $0.6000 dividend, 6.8768 percent yield
    American Airlines Group Inc (NASDAQ: AAL) – $0.1000 dividend, 1.1442 percent yield
    Heidrick & Struggles International, Inc. (NASDAQ: HSII) – $0.1300 dividend, 2.9834 percent yield
    Alcoa Inc (NYSE: AA) – $0.0300 dividend, 1.1321 percent yield
    Sensient Technologies Corporation (NYSE: SXT) – $0.2700 dividend, 1.5341 percent yield

    Posted-In: Ex-DividendNews Dividends Markets Trading Ideas

top 50 stocks to invest in: CRB Futures Index(CR)

Advisors’ Opinion:

  • [By Monica Gerson]

    Crane Co. (NYSE: CR) is expected to post its quarterly earnings at $0.86 per share on revenue of $644.60 million.

    Oceaneering International (NYSE: OII) is projected to post its quarterly earnings at $0.35 per share on revenue of $641.85 million.

  • [By Lisa Levin]

    Crane Co. (NYSE: CR) shares were also up, gaining 12 percent to $67.56 on stronger-than-expected Q3 earnings.

    Equities Trading DOWN

top 50 stocks to invest in: The Baltic Dry Index Soaring, and Double Crown Resources (DDCC)

Advisors’ Opinion:

  • [By James E. Brumley]

    Despite the lackluster economic headlines and so-so pricing, commodities aren’t being used less and less. Indeed, most commodities continue to see growing consumption. It’s not only a scenario that works in favor of young-and-hungry company Double Crown Resources Inc. (OTCMKTS:DDCC), but what makes Double Crown such a compelling opportunity is that it’s rather insensitive to commodity price fluctuation.

    What’s the biggest risk and hassle of shipping things like pellets or beans or salt? Normally they’re delivered in drybulk vessels, which works, but is rather ineffective. At various points between a supplier and a customer, such goods have to be split up, re-routed, taken off a boat and put on a train (or vice versa). Not only do all the middlemen get expensive, mistakes and spillage cost money.

  • [By Matthew Briar]

    Don’t let the lethargic Baltic Dry Index fool you — commodities aren’t being used less now than they have been in the past. In fact, most commodities are still seeing increased consumption, including the dry goods the Baltic Dry Index is supposed to gauge transportation for. The Baltic Dry Index remains in a bit of a long-term funk because, as much as the world continues to increase their need for materials like iron ore, grain, and gravel, the world also still has too much capacity to deliver them. See, too many maritime vessels are competing for too few dollars, serving as a drag on the value of the Baltic Dry Index lower. After all, the BDI is mostly just a measure of the daily shipping rates for ocean-born transportation services. It’s not actually a measure of consumption of those materials consumption.

    It’s not only a scenario that doesn’t work against young-and-hungry company Double Crown Resources Inc. (OTCMKTS:DDCC), but it may actually be a scenario that bodes well for it.

    Thought question: What if there was a way to remove all the risks and hassle of shipping goods such as iron ore pellets or beans or salt (commodities that are normally delivered in drybulk vessels) yet still utilize all the flexibility of intermodal containers? There is. It’s called Translock2, or Translock Squared, and it’s going to revolutionize the way many material companies deliver their goods, and the way many drybulk commodity buyers use their material.

    The image nearby is a Translock2 container. It should look vaguely familiar. It’s essentially an intermodal container in terms of size and shape, but mechanically is a delivery and dispensing platform for drybulk goods like sand or rice. The design allows commodities like sand gravel or livestock feed to be moved with all the flexibility of intermodal transportation (on flatbed trucks, by rail, and on the deck of a boat but without any of the logistical headache of aggregating and splitti

  • [By Matthew Briar]

    It’s not only a scenario that bodes well for an up-and-coming company Double Crown Resources Inc. (OTCMKTS:DDCC).

    What if there were a way to remove all the risks and hassle of shipping things like pellets or beans or salt [which are normally delivered in drybulk vessels] but still utilize all the flexibility of intermodal containers… the big box containers that are just at home on the deck of a ship as they are on a flatbed truck as they are on a train car? There is. It’s called Translock2 (Translock Squared), and it’s going to revolutionize the way many material companies deliver their goods. Commodity companies now have an alternative way of shipping their product without constantly handling it – and losing some of it – en route to its final destination.

    The nearby image is a Translock2 container. If it looks vaguely familiar to most, it’s essentially an intermodal container in terms of size and shape, but mechanically serves as delivery and dispensing platform for drybulk goods like rice, fertilizer, etc. The design allows commodities to be moved with all the flexibility of intermodal transportation, but without any of the headache of aggregating and splitting up those goods en route to their final destination. With Translock2, drybulk purchases are packaged up by the seller at the supply source, and then delivered — just as ordered — all the way to the buyer’s site in the container. No muss, no fuss, and no middleman. It cuts down on expenses, and lost material.

    Its development worth noting, in that it explicitly circumvents the need for drybulk maritime vessels, and turns intermodal container ships into dry cargo vessels.

    The recent unveiling of the Translock 2 containers won’t actually change the amount of drybulk material we as a species consume. But, it will offer dry goods suppliers an easier and often cheaper option to expensive and often difficult dry goods vessel shipping. Remember, the Baltic Dr

  • [By Matthew Briar]

    Despite the conclusions that may be drawn by the renewed weakness of the Baltic Dry Index, demand for commodities isn’t drying up. In fact, most commodities continue to see increased consumption… including the dry goods the Baltic Dry Index is supposed to measure shipping costs for. The Baltic Dry Index is rolling over again simply because as much as the world continues to up their need for materials such as iron ore, grains, and gravel, the market to deliver those goods remains saturated. That is, too many boats, trains and trucks are fighting for the existing level of business, pulling the value of the Baltic Dry Index and other shipping-cost measures lower. After all, the BDI is ultimately just a measure of the daily shipping rates for maritime vessels – it’s not actually a measure of materials consumption.

    Not only does a falling Baltic Dry Index not work against young-and-hungry company Double Crown Resources Inc. (OTCMKTS:DDCC), it may actually favor it.

    Hypothetical question: What if there was a way to remove all the risks and hassle of shipping things like pellets or beans or salt (goods normally delivered in drybulk vessels) yet still utilize all the flexibility of intermodal containers? There is. It’s called Translock2, or Translock Squared, and it’s going to revolutionize the way many material companies deliver their goods, and how users of those goods handle and distribute them.

    The nearby picture is a Translock2 container. It should look familiair, in that it’s essentially an intermodal container in terms of size and shape, but mechanically serves as a delivery and dispensing platform for drybulk goods. The design allows commodities like sand or livestock feed to be transported with all the flexibility of intermodal transportation, but without any of the headache of constantly aggregating and splitting up such goods to get them from point A to point B. With Translock2, drybulk purchases are packaged up by the seller at the s

  • [By Matthew Briar]

    It’s not only a scenario that bodes well for an up-and-coming company Double Crown Resources Inc. (OTCMKTS:DDCC).

    What if there were a way to remove all the risks and hassle of shipping things like pellets or beans or salt [which are normally delivered in drybulk vessels] but still utilize all the flexibility of intermodal containers… the big box containers that are just at home on the deck of a ship as they are on a flatbed truck as they are on a train car? There is. It’s called Translock2 (Translock Squared), and it’s going to revolutionize the way many material companies deliver their goods. Commodity companies now have an alternative way of shipping their product without constantly handling it – and losing some of it – en route to its final destination.

    The nearby image is a Translock2 container. If it looks vaguely familiar to most, it’s essentially an intermodal container in terms of size and shape, but mechanically serves as delivery and dispensing platform for drybulk goods like rice, fertilizer, etc. The design allows commodities to be moved with all the flexibility of intermodal transportation, but without any of the headache of aggregating and splitting up those goods en route to their final destination. With Translock2, drybulk purchases are packaged up by the seller at the supply source, and then delivered — just as ordered — all the way to the buyer’s site in the container. No muss, no fuss, and no middleman. It cuts down on expenses, and lost material.

    Its development worth noting, in that it explicitly circumvents the need for drybulk maritime vessels, and turns intermodal container ships into dry cargo vessels.

    The recent unveiling of the Translock 2 containers won’t actually change the amount of drybulk material we as a species consume. But, it will offer dry goods suppliers an easier and often cheaper option to expensive and often difficult dry goods vessel shipping. Remember, the Baltic Dr

top 50 stocks to invest in: U.S. Auto Parts Network, Inc.(PRTS)

Advisors’ Opinion:

  • [By Lisa Levin]

    In trading on Monday, cyclical consumer goods & services shares rose by just 0.1 percent. Meanwhile, top losers in the sector included U.S. Auto Parts Network, Inc. (NASDAQ: PRTS), down 22 percent, and Sears Holdings Corp (NASDAQ: SHLD), down 13 percent.

  • [By Jim Robertson]

    On Friday, our Under the Radar Moversnewsletter suggestedshorting small cap online aftermarket auto parts stock U.S. Auto Parts Network, Inc (NASDAQ: PRTS):

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