the best stocks

Just five months ago, fellow Fool Leo Sun compared the investing theses for Intel (NASDAQ:INTC) and NXP Semiconductors (NASDAQ:NXPI). He found NXP to be the better pick, thanks to massive growth opportunities and a low PEG ratio.

A lot has changed since that comparison. Intel shares are still trading at roughly the same prices as last September, but NXP got a game-changing buyout bid from sector rival Qualcomm (NASDAQ:QCOM).

So which one of these semiconductor giants would be the better buy today? Let’s have a fresh look.

What’s going on with NXP?

Assuming no new surprises, NXP’s future as an investable asset is crystal clear. Qualcomm has offered a firm $110 per NXP share, to be paid in 100% cash, and with all the necessary financing already lined up. The companies are aiming to close their merger by the end of calendar year 2017, but Qualcomm’s tender offer has been on the table for nearly two months now. All that’s really missing is a handful of regulatory approvals, and this stock is locking in a $110 exit with no questions asked.

the best stocks: Kelly Services Inc.(KELYA)

Advisors’ Opinion:

  • [By Monica Gerson]

    Kelly Services, Inc. (NASDAQ: KELYA) is projected to report its quarterly earnings at $0.28 per share on revenue of $1.35 billion.

    Silver Standard Resources Inc. (USA) (NASDAQ: SSRI) is expected to post a quarterly loss at $0.02 per share on revenue of $96.25 million.

  • [By David Milstead]

    One such outfit is Kelly Services (KELYA). The Troy, Mich., company places temporary employees in a variety of fields, such as law, health care, computing and finance. Although recent job reports have been strong, S&P Capital IQ analyst Michael Jaffe sees employers remaining cautious in their hiring practices and using the kind of temporary workers Kelly specializes in. Jaffe says Kelly is his top pick in the staffing sector, and he rates the stock a strong buy.

the best stocks: (SMPQY)

Advisors’ Opinion:

  • [By SEEKINGALPHA.COM]

    The majority owner is Sun Pharma (OTC:SMPQY) (the largest drug business in India). There have been a number of articles that have outlined Sun Pharma and its quest for Taro, but it makes a lot of sense for Sun to want to own all – and not just the majority – of Taro. One big reason is that owning all of Taro means that any investments that Sun makes with Taros $1.2 billion cash hoard will not be diluted by the presence of minority shareholders. Another reason that Sun likely wants Taro is simply because it is very cheap right now. Sun is run by its founder and majority shareholder, Dilip Shanghvi, who is sort of a pharmaceutical value investor who has opportunistically made acquisitions and investments over time, building his firm starting with a loan of $200 in the early 1980s to the multi-billion business it is today.

  • [By SEEKINGALPHA.COM]

    We believe that two main risks currently exist. First, a few days ago, U.S. Department of Justice filed charges in generic drug price-fixing probe. The U.S. Department of Justice accused two former generic pharmaceutical executives of colluding with other generic manufacturers to fix prices – the first criminal charges stemming from a two-year investigation. Companies in the congressional probe have since publicly disclosed that they have received subpoenas, including Mylan NV (NASDAQ:MYL), Allergan (NYSE:AGN), which later sold its generics business to Teva (NASDAQ:TEVA), Lannett (NYSEMKT:LCI), Impax Laboratories (NASDAQ:IPXL), Endo International (NASDAQ

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